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#SmarkSurvey (7/6/16): What Finishers Deserve A Comeback?



A great finisher is pro wrestling's version of a Patek Philippe watch—it gets passed on from generation to generation. From Mick Foley's old double-arm DDT getting revived as Dean Ambrose's Dirty Deeds to Triple H's Pedigree finding second life as Seth Rollins' new jam, it isn't hard to spot the old classics getting reinvented and repurposed for a new generation of wrestlers.

But on the other hand of the spectrum, we also have a bunch of legitimately great finishers that are just gathering dust. Seriously, in a world where it seems like every Tom, Dick, or Dolph is using and over-using moves like superkicks and powerbombs to the point of genericizing them, why not just reach back into the history books and bust out something more original?

And so, we've got one simple question for all you wrestling fanatics out there: What classic finishers deserve a comeback in today's modern wrestling world?



We've got some thoughts to get the ball rolling.

The Crossface Chickenwing was a devious move used by "Mister" Bob Backlund during his mid-90s WWE comeback, most famously downing Bret "The Hitman" Hart for the World Championship he claims he never should have lost.

Putting tremendous trauma on the entire shoulder structure of its victim once properly locked on, it's been busted out on occasion by such current Superstars as Triple H, Dean Ambrose, or Cesaro, but never as a primary finish. Perhaps now would be a great time to bring this deadly submission back to prominence.



Victoria was one of the most beloved early-era Divas, not just because of her great look, deranged gimmick, and freaking awesome entrance theme, but because of her neck-snapping finisher known as the Widow's Peak.



Always visually impressive, the move was one of the more cringeworthy finishers of its era, always drawing an audible gasp from the audience who thought the WWE's original "crazy chick" had broken one more spine.

And speaking of classics, how about "Mr. Perfect" Curt Hennig's world-famous Perfect-Plex?



While his son Curtis Axel did bust it out on occasion when he could actually get decent TV time, it always took a backseat to his "real" finisher, the hangman's facebuster dubbed the Axehole. In fact, off the top of our heads, the only guy we can ever remember getting pinned by it was the original Sin Cara. A move that took its original user to two celebrated reigns as Intercontinental Champion could be great in today's wrestling world.

(And let's not forget—Mr. Perfect once pulled it off on the Big Show.)




Inhuman. They didn't call it the Perfect-Plex for nothing.

You know what else was inhuman? Lex Luger's old Torture Rack backbreaker. What a simple, but brutally painful move to behold.



Looking like a medieval implement of pain stretching every ligament and muscle along his opponent's back to its limit, this was one of the most iconic submission moves of the 1990s. And let's not forget its historical significance—it was the first ever submission hold to defeat Hulk Hogan for a World Championship. Why this move isn't in the repertoire of today's powerhouses like Braun Strowman or Big E is beyond us.

Powerbombs are always great, and we wish someone would pick up the crucifix powerbomb variant used by such household names as Razor Ramon and Sheamus on the regular. We've seen Roman Reigns use it as a transition move, but never to the same levels of significance of his Superman Punch or Spear; wouldn't you love a new-look, new-attitude Reigns annihilating more foes with this as his new trademark finisher?



What other moves do you think deserve a comeback as finishers, and by whom? Let us know your top five suggestions in the comments section below, and we'll round up the results in the future!

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