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#FinisherFriday (1/25/19): The GTR


Welcome to another edition of #FinisherFriday! This is Wreddit_Regal bringing to an analysis of one of the most brutal finishers to grace the NJPW canvas.

A modern-day samurai—this practically embodies the whole character of Hirooki Goto. A stoic, fierce, unrelenting warrior who paves a path for himself towards the top, the Aramusha can arguably be called one of the dark horses of NJPW's heavyweight division because history shows he can beat the top guys in non-title matches.

With that said, this conglomerate of qualities has aided him in securing NJPW title gold, where he became a two-time IWGP Intercontinental Champion, one-time IWGP Tag Team Champion, one-time IWGP Junior Heavyweight Tag Team Champion, four-time NEVER Openweight Champion and one-time winner of the G1 Climax (2008), two-time winner of the World Tag League (2012 and 2014) and three-time winner of the New Japan Cup (2009, 2010 and 2012).

For me, Hirooki Goto is one of those wrestlers whose signature moves can all be utilized as finishing manoeuvres from their sheer destructiveness. His current arsenal has the finest mixture of eye candy, fluidity and brute force. Most notable of these are:

1. Shouten Kai


2. Ura Shouten


3. Kaiten


4. Shoryu Kekkai


5. Ushigoroshi


And his newest (by that, we mean his latest creation) finisher, the Goto Revolution, or GTR:


Talk about wreaking havoc into the human anatomy in the most efficient way possible. Anyway, the GTR can be done in the following steps:
  1. Start with a standing inverted headlock using your nondominant hand
  2. With your dominant hand, make a threatening gesture to the crowd (like a throat slice) to let them know that the match is going to end
  3. Perform a lariat using your dominant arm, while at the same time kneeling with one knee (preferably the leg opposite the dominant hand), letting the opponent's back fall on your other knee



Crude, but highly effective. At first glance, it may seem like any other stuff that Roderick Strong does aside from his End of Heartache, but is there really more to this move than what we see? Let's find out.

Aside from the normal effects of a standard backbreaker, the other devastating factor in this move is the fact that Goto hyperextends the opponent's neck to God-knows-how-many degrees, using the opponent's head as a pitiful lever to bend the neck as far as possible, aided by his knee becoming a makeshift fulcrum. (Think of it like breaking something in half using your knee, or performing the Torture Rack sans lifting the opponent on your shoulders.)



The lariat and backbreaker combo is done in one quick movement, allowing the head to snap forward, resulting in what we conventionally call a whiplash injury, which damages the cervical spine and possibly the spinal cord if done with such power.



Add to that the blunt trauma to the head/windpipe from the lariat, and you have a deadly trio that can almost always guarantee a three-count.

And there you have it chaps, the GTR deconstructed! Will 2019 be the year Goto finally wins heavyweight gold? Let us know in the comment section below!
*****
Wreddit_Regal is the resident sports kinesiologist of Reddit's wrestling forum,r/squaredcircle. From the most basic of punches to the most intricate double-team manoeuvres, he can explain them within the realm of human anatomy and physics, because when doing absolutely nothing wrestling-related, he also happens to work as an operating room nurse.

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