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#ThemeSongTuesday: S.O.S.!


Welcome to #ThemeSongTuesday! We're in the middle of another wild week in wrestling thanks to the events held by both WWE and PWR in which several hidden gems were allowed to shine very bright.

One such gem is Kofi Kingston, who's been on our TV screens for the better part of the last eleven years. And yet, he hasn't really had the opportunities of a John Cena or a Seth Rollins or even a Daniel Bryan. In fact, you can go through his WrestleMania history and you'll find that like Dolph Ziggler, Kofi has never had a singles 'Mania match in his career.

We hope that changes this week after his extraordinary performances at last week's SmackDown Live gauntlet match and the Elimination Chamber main event. The whole world has been talking about Kofi over the last week or so, and it is no different here at the Smark Henry offices. That's why it's only fitting that we put the spotlight on him by featuring his first entrance theme from his days as a singles performer.


Remember when Kofi Kingston was billed as a Jamaican wrestler (despite not having any Jamaican blood at all)? Yes, kids, there was a time when Kofi actually talked with a Jamaican accent and portrayed the Jamaican stereotypes. Eventually, it was retconned when Kofi just dropped his accent much like how Lana dropped her Russian accent.


And then Kofi's home country was retconned into "Ghana, West Africa," which doesn't even make sense because Ghana is an actual country and West Africa is neither a territory nor a country. Oh well, wrestling logic. *shrug*

Since Kofi was initially presented as an always-smiling super babyface from Jamaica, it made sense that his theme had to be reggae (because Jamaica), upbeat, and non-threatening. So legendary WWE songwriter and composer Jim Johnston went to work and wrote a song for Collie Buddz, an American/Bermudian reggae singer who is most known for a song about weed being legalized and having a stage name that is a not-so-subtle reference to the plant that keeps a certain Philippine head of state awake.


"S.O.S." is exactly what it sounds like. It's a reggae theme for a Jamaican babyface and it talks about a dude who comes into the picture to save whoever is in need. He's basically the title character in Parokya Ni Edgar's "Mang Jose," except he doesn't charge you for his services.

You know (you know)
What me say
SOS
I hear them shoutin
I hear them cryin
Because
You woke up in a badman place
You no safe you could run for days
You can't get away
I bring relief for sorrow and pain
You should of never tried get in my face

And it's a shame (what a shame)
You lose your life
You have no (no) more (more) time
Your destiny (knee) is (is) mine (here them callin)

SOS (I hear them callin)
SOS (I hear them shoutin)
SOS I hear them cryin
SOS (I hear them callin)

You know (you know)
What me say, boo

Hey mister I been telling you
To be afraid
Cause this badman
Him have bad news for you today

And it's a shame (what a shame)
You lose your life
You have no (no) more (more) time
Your destiny (knee) is (is) mine (here them callin)

SOS (I hear them callin)
SOS (I hear them shoutin)
SOS I hear them cryin
SOS (I hear them callin)
You know

You woke up in a badman place
You no safe you could run for days
You can't get away
I bring relief for sorrow and pain
You should of never tried get in my face

And it's a shame (what a shame)
You lose your life
You have no (no) more (more) time
Your destiny (knee) is (is) mine (here them callin)

SOS (I hear them callin)
SOS (I hear them shoutin)
SOS (I hear them cryin)
SOS (I hear them callin)

What's interesting about "S.O.S." is that it's pretty formulaic in the same way CFO$ constructs songs in a loop. If you're listening to the version Kofi used as his entrance theme, it's hook-verse-hook-verse-repeat.

But if you've got the album version, you'll notice that the intro is much longer. And then it's hook-hook-verse-hook-verse-repeat. It's just a longer version of the song, so you're not really missing much if all you're familiar with is the entrance remix.

"S.O.S." was a song that I grew tired of hearing, especially when it seemed like Kofi Kingston was a character that was just running in place as a midcard babyface. When The New Day came together and got a new theme song, I didn't miss it at all.


But now that it's been almost five years since Kofi, Big E, and Xavier Woods joined forces behind the Power of Positivity, I actually miss "S.O.S." Hell, looking back, I can see myself in a live arena and bobbing my head along to the song and smiling because that's exactly what Kofi and his gimmick wanted to get out of you. I mean, just look at his entrance video from those days. All his close-up shots feature him just smiling instead of looking threatening or intimidating. Good guy Kofi, indeed.

What I don't miss is Kofi Kingston being taken for granted, especially now that he's shown the whole world that he can perform when the lights are brightest. He may not have won the WWE Championship at Elimination Chamber. But he surely made a case for himself to be a part of the SmackDown Live main event scene in the immediate future. The best part is that he showed all of us that he's money with or without The New Day.

If he ever gets the ball and gets rocket-strapped, everyone better watch out and send out an S.O.S.

Header image from Uproxx; photo from WWE

*****


Stan Sy (@_StanSy) is the Editor at Large of Smark Henry and is also a radio DJ on Wave 89.1, an events host, a freelance writer, and one of the hosts of The Smark Gilas-Pilipinas Podcast. He also used to be one of the hosts and writers of The Wrestling Gods on FOX. He enjoys watching WWE, NXTLucha Underground, and the occasional New Japan match. You can ask him questions about wrestling, Survivor (yes, the reality show), or whatever you like on his CuriousCat account.

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