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#FinisherFriday (6/29/19): The L-Bomb



Welcome to another edition of #FinisherFriday! This is Wreddit_Regal giving an analysis of another weird finisher in the WWE books.

I've seen my fair share of odd maneuvers that seem to do their purpose in matches, from the notorious Saxtonation to the Rear View. Surely it doesn't seem visually appealing to most, but when you closely examine the physics and anatomy behind those moves, then you would come to realize that a move doesn't really need to be flashy to achieve results.

As such, a certain move has caught my attention earlier while browsing Wreddit. On the NXT June 27 episode, a match occurred between Joaquin Wilde (formerly known as DJZ) and Angel Garza. "Garza, as in Hector Garza?" you might ask. Yes, the lad is Hector Garza's nephew, which meant that the illustrious Segura (El Ninja) and Garza wrestling blood flowed in his veins. True enough, he showed it in his debut match, giving the audience a glimpse of who could carry NXT in the future.

The match had some good back and forth action, which culminated in a beautiful top-rope Spanish fly, and this finisher:


The audience literally went quiet as Garza executed his finisher, not being able to fully comprehend what the maneuver was. Yes, Garza had the pinfall victory, but to most of the Full Sail audience the finish was actually underwhelming—he did a very high-risk move, followed by a "second-tier" move.

Does that sound familiar to you? Well, it should be, because the situation is basically the Judas Effect or Lightning Fist sequence—one power move followed by a supposed match-ender that lacks the "intensity" of the former.

But enough with nitpicking the move, let's analyze how this stuff works.

Step-by-step, this is how the move is done:


  1. The attacker secures a double underhook or a butterfly lock onto a standing opponent, while tucking the opponent's head under their armpit
  2. The attacker lifts the opponent, causing both of the opponent's legs wrapping around the attacker's waist
  3. While in this position, the attacker falls down on his arse, supposedly dealing damage to his opponent and gaining the 1-2-3


Fun fact: Catrina (formerly known as Maxine on NXT) did the same move, named the L-Bomb:



Now that we know the move process, how does the L-Bomb actually deal damage?

While most people would believe that the main point of damage is the tailbone (like the Bubba Bomb), this is not the target area. Although the tailbone does come in contact with the canvas, the opponent's thighs sit on top of the attacker's thighs, which actually cushion the opponent's bum, therefore receiving a fairly reduced amount of damage.

Hey, don't stare at them like that Bubba!

The real point of damage is the neck. The act of securing a double underhook and tucking the opponent's head below your armpit is one of the ways to do a neck crank:



Just a little downward force when you hold the said position causes the opponent's cervical spine to hyperflex, which greatly strains the musculature of the neck, and can cause damage to the cervical vertebrae itself.



With the opponent's arms rendered immobile because of the double underhook, there is no chance of relieving the pressure by trying to push the opponent away to create space. With the opponent's torso in an upright position, the neck is forced to bend in a more uncomfortable degree when the attacker falls down and lands on his arse. This can cause so much pain that the opponent will choose not to resist any further, allowing the opponent to get the pinfall victory.



It's definitely a good standalone submission without the landing on the bum thingy, but when you add that instant hyperflexion, the pain is multiplied to intolerable levels so it's sort of justified.


And there you have it chaps, the L-Bomb analyzed! Since there is no official name for Garza's finisher, what do you think the name is going to be? Let us know in the comment section below!

*****

Wreddit_Regal is the resident sports kinesiologist of Reddit's wrestling forum, r/squaredcircle. From the most basic of punches to the most intricate double-team maneuvers, he can explain them within the realm of human anatomy and physics, because when doing absolutely nothing wrestling-related, he also happens to work as an operating room nurse.

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