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#FinisherFriday: The Mushroom Stomp (And Foot Stomps In General)


Welcome to another edition of #FinisherFriday! This is Wreddit_Regal giving an analysis of the Carolina Caveman's NXT finisher.

Trevor Lee (now working under the name Cameron Grimes) may not be a household name, but his wrestling acumen may make him one in the very near future. Having polished his craft and captured gold in numerous places outside of WWE soil, he has since developed a beautiful moveset that balances both aesthetics and brutality.



Making his WWE debut on the inaugural NXT Breakout Tournament, he set to put on a clinic with his opponent Isaiah "Swerve" Scott (formerly known as Shane Strickland/Killshot), which ended with the following sequence:


Pretty straightforward, both athletic and brutal, does the job right - that's a good finisher for you.

You know, elevated foot stomps belong to those kinds of finishers wherein you really have to ACTIVELY AND CONSCIOUSLY shave off most of the force, or risk the opponent suffering a debilitating injury which will affect his job and livelihood...


...but some guys just lose the will to care halfway:







I'd obviously add the Curbstomp here, but I'd give it a pass since I already made an article about it.


So how do you do an elevated foot stomp that temporarily incapacitates the opponent, while making sure that they would live to wrestle another day? Here are some ways that I can think of:

1. The attacker must shift his/her center of gravity in front of or behind both feet. It simply means leaning forward or back while doing it instead of being on a very straight vertical position. That way, not all of the attacker's weight would be on the opponent's body upon impact, sparing them from severe blunt trauma or fractured bones.

2. Do not "go through" when both feet connect. You might have seen most diving foot stomps that seem to slide on the opponent's body instead of them crashing down like crash test dummies. This is an attacker's last-minute effort to dissipate the mass/force of the attack to keep the opponent somewhat safe. That's why you sometimes see them rolling forward or backwards immediately after both feet make contact with the opponent's body, to make sure that the opponent "doesn't get all of it."

3. Hit other parts of the body that can take more damage than usual. Also a tricky thing to pull off, since almost all of the human anatomy isn't designed to take more damage than usual. Hence, it mostly is a combination of all three strategies. Trevor Cameron manages to pull this off by hitting either the shoulder area or the pectorals, so that the opponent loses the strength to raise both of their shoulders to break the pinfall or gets the wind knocked out of them. But he must perform this with precision: the clavicles (collarbones) are relatively easy to break, especially when a 209-pound man starts to jump with all of his might and attempts to drive an opponent's upper body onto the mat.

Using my trusty Regal Rating, it's pretty easy to score this one:

9/10 for aesthetics: The act of jumping and stomping on an opponent's body is a fight tactic that is as old as time. Any inexperienced fighter who can inexplicably put their opponent below them would almost always think of stomping their opponent's body in. It's like the beauty of the move comes from the fact that it's a guaranteed kill tactic (aside from the fact that it's plain awesome to look at).

7/10 for practicality: If you can't jump high enough like Cameron Grimes does, then you can't use this in any point of the match, and would thus be confined to using it as an "endgame finisher." It also has its plus points: if the opponent still has the strength to evade the move, it's no problem since you're landing on both feet anyway (compared to splashes or sentons).

And that wraps it for my analysis of the Mushroom Stomp (and foot stomps in general)! Do you have questions related to the mechanics of the move? Let us know in the comment section below!

*****
Wreddit_Regal is the resident sports kinesiologist of Reddit's wrestling forum, r/squaredcircle. From the most basic of punches to the most intricate double-team maneuvers, he can explain them within the realm of human anatomy and physics, because when doing absolutely nothing wrestling-related, he also happens to work as an operating room nurse.

Comments

  1. This has to be my favorite dissection of a move. Also, yeah. Trevor Lee/Cameron Grimes' stomp is a thing of beauty. Other kickass variations of it I liked are from Aleister Black/Tommy End's Owari Death Stomp, and Low Ki's Warrior's Way (which is already in the article I think!)

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