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#FinisherFriday (9/20/19): The Garvin Stomp


Welcome to another edition of #FinisherFriday! Today I won't be reviewing a finisher, but a signature move—one that has stood the test of time and passed on to another predator.

Roger Barnes had differing amounts of success on different promotions (including the time when he defeated Ric Flair for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship), but it was at the World Wrestling Federation that he gained mainstream popularity. Fighting under the name "Rugged" Ronnie Garvin, he became a fan favorite who also happened to exact precise amounts of punishment to his unfortunate opponents.

Garvin became known for his simple but calculated way of incapacitating his opponents. He would stomp at different areas of the opponent's body (mainly targeting the major joints), before giving the final stomp on the chest or head. In time, this string of actions became known as the "Garvin Stomp."


Although Garvin did not fare well in the long run and became a thing of the past, his legacy lives on - in the hands of the Apex Predator. Yes, Randy Orton has adapted this move onto his repertoire of inflicting damage to his enemies with razor-like precision.



The former NWA Champion’s famed Stomp is as simple as it is effective and can be applied in a few easy steps:

  1. Approach vulnerable opponent lying on the mat.
  2. Stomp left shoulder.
  3. Stomp left elbow.
  4. Stomp left hip.
  5. Stomp left knee.
  6. Stomp right knee.
  7. Stomp right hip.
  8. Stomp right elbow.
  9. Stomp right shoulder.
  10. Stomp chest or head.



As we all know with his ".....dive" tweet a couple of years ago, Randy Orton is the "no flips, just fists" kind of guy (probably the reason why he is such good buddies with The Revival now). He prefers to employ simple moves and good in-ring psychology instead of the good lucha stuff that prevails the modern wrestling scene. With his traditional approach of rendering opponents unable to break his pin attempt, the Garvin Stomp is a good addition to his arsenal, because all the major joints needed by the opponent to move their limbs are messed up, leaving them at the mercy of the Viper.

Using my Regal Rating, I'd give it:

10/10 for aesthetics. It's brutal, it's done in a symmetrical fashion, it brings out a primal desire to inflict damage to an opponent in the most savage way possible—it really deserves a perfect 10 from me.

10/10 for damage and practicality. I mean, it's not really a finishing move, but it sure is at the very top of all those signature finishers. It's relatively simple to do, and doesn't require any ridiculous setups before you stomp away/

And that's it chaps, my review of the Garvin Stomp! Do you know of any other new-generation wrestlers who adapted old moves from their predecessors? Let us know in the comment section below!

*****

Wreddit_Regal is the resident sports kinesiologist of Reddit's wrestling forum, r/squaredcircle. From the most basic of punches to the most intricate double-team maneuvers, he can explain them within the realm of human anatomy and physics, because when doing absolutely nothing wrestling-related, he also happens to work as an operating room nurse.

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