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The Hourrr of Powerrr (1/1/20): Strictly Come Businessing


Apologies for having missed last week's review of the show. It was Christmas, and we could all be forgiven for skipping a little work, even if the wrestling world doesn't stop. Besides, it's not like too much happened—all you missed was a Hard Times-lite Tim Storm soliloquy, a drunk Eli Drake promo, and the low-key arrival of "The Pope" D'Angelo Dinero.


Thankfully, they recap the best parts of the Tim Storm promo, which was compelling enough to move hearts and recast him as an underdog everyone can get behind. This time, however, it's for his hunt for the NWA TV Championship. After the rub he got from being the recipient of Nick Aldis's heel turn and the formation of Strictly Business (that's their little group), it's safe to say he's one of the favorites to win; I just wouldn't be surprised if he loses so that he can go after Aldis and the world title.

It wasn't 'til they gave Tim Storm some to cut a heartfelt promo that I appreciated his clean-cut babyface role in the NWA. Guys like Eli Drake, James Storm, and Nick Aldis (to an extent) made the rough anti-hero look cool enough that I thought it was the way things worked here. It also helps that Powerrr is the kind of place where actual faces can thrive, as long as you've got the mic skills to hang.

So I certainly hope Storm goes further than this, because they need a guy like him standing toe-to-toe and maybe anchoring some resistance against Strictly Business. On top of that, they'll also need to start grooming a young guy in the same role, too, to future-proof the brand. (The other guy who I'm thinking could do this role is Colt Cabana, and he's not exactly young.)

Speaking of Strictly Business, it's about time Aldis turned the heel schtick all the way up, because I'm loving how good he is now that he isn't trying to pretend to be someone honorable. While I understand the narrative need for him to front (it does make for the better story, in this glorious age of TV dramas), his heel role was what the show sorely needed in the first season.

That said, the tournament is the only thing that's compelling about Powerrr right now. There's something brewing between Eli Drake, Ken Anderson, and Colt Cabana, but that's about it. Even the Tag Team Championships have been put on the back burner thanks to the Wild Cards being in Strictly Business. I knew the Rock 'n' Roll Express should've lost the second time.

NWA Powerrr 1/1/20 Grade: You start to get the feeling that one big story is starting to dominate a lot of the show, and it doesn't help that Aron Stevens and his antics are starting to become a little grating. B

The Powerrr Train

  • Something I noticed and would have said if I had a review last week: might be a little late to the party, but Eli Drake feels like this generation's Rock, huh? There's something there if they let him loose and push him to the moon. I'd love to see what comes from it, and seeing as wrestling promotions have largely been built on the backs of hyper-charismatic dudes, it's definitely worth a shot.
  • How many betrayals are we going to see in the women's division? After Marti Belle betrays Allysin Kay with Thunder Rosa, now they're setting her up to be screwed by Melina and Rosa? This would be more sensible if they were running some sort of internal conflict story where Marti realizes turning on her so-called best friend just to be cool is a bad idea, but I'm not entirely sure I can give them credit for that.
  • I get that Pope is looking to associate himself with a team, but what about the tag champs? What are the Rock 'n' Rolls up to now?
  • I am completely satisfied with Trevor Murdoch's Indian Deathlock.
  • Why haven't we seen Marty Scurll in weeks? One would think he needs to wrestle in one of these episodes to keep his momentum going, and now he's damp as hell.
*****

Romeo Moran (@roiswaris the Editor in Chief of Smark Henry, one of the four hosts of the Wrestling-Wrestling Podcast, and is associated with Philippine Wrestling Revolution. He gets by in this hard knock life through working in publishing. Smark Henry was his and Stan Sy's original vision of a watering hole for local wrestling fans. He roots for the undersized guys who hit hard, and he likes taking your wrestling questions over on his Curiouscat account.

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